A profile of Txema Bofill (1953-2015), aka ‘Sabata’. From Grupos Autónomos: una crónica armada de la transición democrática by Joni D. (El Lokal, Barcelona, 2014) pp. 60-69 — Translated by Paul Sharkey

 Anarchism in Spain, News  Comments Off on A profile of Txema Bofill (1953-2015), aka ‘Sabata’. From Grupos Autónomos: una crónica armada de la transición democrática by Joni D. (El Lokal, Barcelona, 2014) pp. 60-69 — Translated by Paul Sharkey
Dec 212015
 
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Txema Bofill (1953-2015), aka ‘Sabata’

Sabata (from sabata, the Catalan word for shoe) decided as a child he was intended for the priesthood and was entered into a seminary, which he later left, unable to live up to the vow of celibacy. Born in 1953, this restless child of a bourgeois Catalan Catholic family from La Bisbal was captivated by the charismatic personality of a local priest and decided to follow in his footsteps, despite his father’s misgivings, who believed that at the age of nine he did not know enough to make such a monumental decision. The village priest, a dynamic character, impressed Sabata, as did Catalanism and the sense of brotherhood. He also discovered repression at first hand at this time: camping near the border they were surrounded one night by Civil Guard troops; on another occasion, during a night-time crossing, a cheeky retort to a challenge from two police officers earned him a slap in the face. His ‘radicalisation began in the seminary, as he graduated from child to adolescent in the company of worker priests, followers of Liberation Theology and reading banned books from France. Most people in the border area had relatives in France and the proximity of the frontier made contact that much easier.

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Dec 272010
 

Federica Montseny (CNT Minister of Health in Largo Caballero Gvt - 'nuff said!)

Broadcast 5 January 1982 (in Spanish):”El anarquismo. La víspera de nuestro tiempo. Diálogos con la historia”. Presented by Jose Antonio Silva. Participants: Federica Montseny (among many other subversions of anarchist principles a minister in the Largo Caballero government); Jose Álvarez Junco (Professor of Political Sciences); Josep María Bricall (Professor of Economics); y Josep Termes (Professor of History at the University of Barcelona). Includes a report on how the Spanish labour movement evolved towards anarchism.

FILMS

Sep 262010
 

The military/fascist uprising of July 18/19 1936 triggered a popular social and libertarian revolution against centuries of oppression by the Roman Catholic Church, a ruthless land-owning,  industrial and commercial oligarchy, and a brutal state apparatus. This audiovisual slideshow, produced in 2006 to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the libertarian revolution of July 1936, in conjunction with a travelling exhibition of the same name, highlights some of the historical moments of ‘the short summer of anarchy’ when the dream of a new world began to materialise.

‘We will always remember the triumph of the crucial moment when the people, spontaneous and determined by the same impulse, decided — in Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Bilbao, and in so many other cities — to seize the barracks, official buildings, telephone exchanges, radio stations, churches, fields, factories and workshops…. Wonderful days of illusion, when we felt intoxicated by a great victory, beautiful and pure …’

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