Nov 122013
 

john davisI. “Aren’t We All Rich Now?”

It is one thing to commit crimes against property, and a vastly different thing to commit crimes in behalf of property.

Gustavus Myers, History of the Great American Fortunes

It could not be claimed that, in terms of their political-economic beliefs, there were striking differences between the Presidential candidates of the two major parties in 1924.

The Democratic Party candidate was the handsome, soft-spoken, Wall Street attorney, John W. Davis, former U. S. Solicitor General and one-time Ambassador to Great Britain, whom the King of England had characterized as “one of the most perfect gentlemen I have ever met.” Once regarded as an outstanding Liberal, Davis — now a director in the United States Rubber Company, the National Bank of Commerce, the Santa Fe Railroad and other such concerns  —had this to say of himself:

I have a fine list of clients. What lawyer wouldn’t want them? I have J. P. Morgan & Company, the Erie Railroad, the Guaranty Trust Company, the Standard Oil Company, and other foremost American concerns on my list. I am proud of them. They are big institutions and as long as they ask for my service for honest work, I am pleased to work for them. Big Business has made this country what it is. We want Big Business . . .

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Apr 092013
 

       For twelve years this Nation was afflicted with hear- nothing, see-nothing, do-nothing Government. The Nation looked to the Government but the Government looked away. Nine mocking years with the golden calf and three long years of the scourge! Nine crazy years at the tickertape and three long years in the breadlines! Nine mad years of mirage and three long years of despair!  

President Franklin D. Roosevelt
October 31, 1936
Warren_G_Harding

Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923), the 29th President of the United States (1921–1923)

I. The Making of a President

The Republican National Convention, which took place in June 1920 in Chicago, Illinois, was a most extraordinary affair.

The Presidency was for sale,” writes Karl Schriftgiesser in This Was Normalcy, “The city of Chicago, never averse to monetary indecencies, was jam-packed with frenzied bidders, their pockets bulging with money with which to buy the prize. The Coliseum became a market place, crowded with stock gamblers, oil promoters, mining magnates, munition makers, sports promoters, and soap makers . . . The lobbies and rooms of the Loop hotels were in a turmoil as the potential buyers of office scurried about lining up their supporters, making their deals, issuing furtive orders, passing out secret funds.”

HarryFordSinclair

Harry Ford Sinclair, head of Sinclair Oil Company

Among the captains of industry and finance who had flocked into the Windy City to make sure the Republican Presidential candidate was a man to their taste were Harry F. Sinclair, head of the Sinclair Oil Company, who had already invested $75,000 in the Republican campaign and was to put up another $185,000 before the campaign was over; Judge Elbert H. Gary, Chairman of the Board of Directors of U.S. Steel, whose name had figured prominently in the smashing of the 1919 steel strike; Samuel M. Vauclain,  president of the Baldwin Locomotive Company; Thomas W. Lamont, partner in the firm of J. P. Morgan and Company; Edward L. Doheny, president of the Pan American Petroleum Company; and William Boyce Thompson, the copper magnate, who had recently returned from Soviet Russia, where as head of the American Red Cross mission he had staked $1,000,000 of his own money  in an effort to stem the tide of the Russian Revolution.

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May 202012
 

(Jacket design by Vitali Golev

Moscow Ain’t The Place It Used To Be, Barry Jones. ISBN 978-1-873976-53-1, published in 2011 by ChristieBooks, Hastings, East Sussex UK —  Check out all Kindle editions of ChristieBooks titles  NOW AVAILABLE ON KINDLE — £2.61/€3,08/$3.88 READ INSIDE!  ¡LEER EL INTERIOR!

UK : £2.61 ; USA : $3.88; Germany : €3,08 ; France :  €3,08 ; Spain:  €3,08 ; Italy :   €3,08 ; Japan : ¥ 371 ; India : R219.54 : Canada : CDN$ 4.01 ; Brazil : R$ 7.89

MOSCOW 1991 to 1996. Following the collapse of Gorbachev’s Soviet Union, Londoner Norman ‘Nobby’ Jackson, a Moscow-based failed business ‘consultant’ and amateur-Classicist-turned-private detective,  joins forces again with his old sparring partner Colonel Lev Alexandrovitch Shcheglov, head of Moscow’s CID (see ‘Nobby’s’ previous adventures in ‘Moscow Ain’t Such A Bad Place’), to disentangle a Byzantine plot that links the murders of London gangsters attending an international criminal convention in Moscow to carve up territories and ‘spheres of interest’ in the former Soviet Union, and the serial killer who has been slaughtering and mutilating local prostitutes over a five-year period. The labyrinthine investigation leads ‘Nobby’ — ably assisted by Anzhelika, his ‘clairvoyant’ lover and business partner — through the cut-throat post-Soviet milieu of gangster-capitalism, the mafiya, political conspiracies, would-be putschists, and an international terrorist plot to destroy Moscow, provoke a nuclear war and the break-up of the Russian Federation.

BARRY JONES, Moscow’s own Arthur Dailey, was a scholar, raconteur and Mr Fix-it, well known for his ability to arrange almost anything in the city that he made his home town from 1976 until his expulsion — in chains — from the Russian Federation in 2001. Moscow Ain’t The Place It Used To Be, the second and last of his ‘Moscow’ thrillers, is a compelling story peopled by extraordinary characters, and provides a sympathetic and uniquely well-informed insider’s view of the grittier side of life in Yeltsin’s ‘New Russia’.

(Barry Jones lived and worked in Moscow for twenty-five years (1976-2001) as a translator, translating over sixty books in a variety of specialist and non-specialist subjects, eg. economics, philosophy, politics, sociology, taxation, customs documentation, music, sport, art, philately, circus & entertainment, and much else.

From 1991 to 1994 he was Head of Legal and Business Translation at the INTERFAX News agency in Moscow where he translated the Constitutions of the Russian Federation and those of each of the former Soviet Republics. He also translated dozens of laws, statutes, presidential decrees and other legislative and legal documents as well as a continuous flow of articles on oil and gas, agriculture, mining and minerals, finance and banking, and commerce in general.

In 1995 he began work on a two-year project to translate the archives of more than 100 Russian museums for the US Library of Congress, part of which can be viewed on “ArcheoBiblioBase: The Archives of Russia

From then until his expulsion in chains on trumped up charges in 2001 he worked as a freelance translator. His biggest projects were “The Celestial Garden” – by the playwright, Azat Abdullin — on the life of Rudolf Nuriyev — and a series of learned articles on medieval Georgian astronomy.)

Dec 282011
 

Rogue Agents (2011 update) Click on image to read

FOREWORD (2011) This third and final edition of Rogue Agents extends biographical information up to 201 1, particularly of the American allies of the complex, and of the core complex members — January 2011 marked the death of both Huyn and Richardson, and Habsburg died in July 2011 aged 98, whilst Fraga and Crozier live on. Violet – well, no-one has ever known. Recent university research on Interdoc and Franco’s Spain has been summarised and referenced; the section on CEDI has been much expanded; considerable information has been added on the Catholic groups Conseil international pour l’ordre Chrétien (CIOC) and the Comité International pour la Défense de la Civilisation Chrétienne (CIDCC) which involved Pinay, Violet, Dubois and Franco’s ministers in the 1950s and 1960s.

Pinay Circle - Rogue's Gallery (click to view)

This final edition has therefore swollen to nearly 150,000 words; the full version now includes a documentary annex of some 175 pages of intemal documents as well as photographs of the main participants covered in this twenty-year investigation. This work has also expanded from text to video: the reader will find, in the footnotes, links to online footage of Crozier and his key American 6I allies such as Romerstein for the International Freedom Foundation, and Huyn for the Center for Intelligence Studies (search for ‘c-spanarchives’ to find all video links). As the documentary and picture annexes considerably increase the size of the PDF file, two versions of the book are now published: this full version, best viewed as a PDF (481 pages, 41 MB), and a shorter version (‘text only‘, 290 pages, 1.4 MB), containing the complete text, footnotes, sources and NSIC and IFF annexes, but without the documentary and picture annexes, suitable for emailing or printing.

David Teacher

Sep 222011
 

Click here for further details

Moscow Ain’t Such A Bad Place, Barry Jones. ISBN 978-1-873976-48-7, published in 2011 by ChristieBooks, Hastings, East Sussex UK —  Check out all Kindle editions of ChristieBooks titles  NOW AVAILABLE ON KINDLE — £2.61/€3,08/$3.88 READ INSIDE!  ¡LEER EL INTERIOR!

UK : £2.61 ; USA : $3.88; Germany : €3,08 ; France :  €3,08 ; Spain:  €3,08 ; Italy :   €3,08 ; Japan : ¥ 371 ; India : R219.54 : Canada : CDN$ 4.12 ; Brazil : R$ 7.89

MOSCOW 1987: With Gorbachev’s Soviet Union in a state of flux and uncertainty, Londoner Norman ‘Nobby’ Robert Jackson — amateur Classicist, fluent Russian-speaker, business consultant and blackmarketeer living comfortably in Moscow with two mistresses — is approached by a fellow British businessman to locate the ‘Apsheron icon’. All is not what it seems, however. Next day ‘Nobby’ discovers the man brutally bludgeoned to death in his hotel room. Who has killed him, and why? Pursued to Yalta with his mistresses, he finds he has become the target for a killer. Determined to find those responsible for a series of brutal murders of friends and associates attending a British trade exhibition in Moscow, ‘Nobby’ finds his quest entangling him with Major Shcheglov of the Moscow Police, Grigori Vladimirovitch of the KGB, and George Trenden, head of the SIS’s Soviet Desk, taking him from Yalta to Moscow, London and Devon and back to Moscow again on the trail of a mysterious and powerful international cabal conspiring to change the course of history.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: I first met Barry Jones  in Moscow in the late 1980s when I was travelling regularly to Russia (as publisher of Arguments and Facts International, and Central Asia and the Caucasus in World Affairs) and I promised him at the time that I would try to ensure his novels saw the light of day. MOSCOW AIN’T SUCH A BAD PLACE is the first of his ‘Moscow’ novels, a compelling story peopled by fascinating characters, and providing a sympathetic and unique insight into the people and pattern of daily life in Moscow during the heady days of glasnost, perestroika, and the dramatic buildup to the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991.

Barry Jones was Moscow’s own cross between Sir Kenneth Clark and Arthur Dailey, a scholar, raconteur and Mr Fix-it, well known for his ability to arrange almost anything in the city that he made his home from 1976 until his expulsion — in chains — from the Russian Federation in 2001. He had made one powerful enemy too many. Barry died seven years ago, in Cornwall, in unexplained circumstances. Before he died, however, he sent me the manuscript of the sequel work, MOSCOW AIN’T THE PLACE IT USED TO BE, a massive three volume novel on a par with War and Peace: 1991 – The Gangland Speculation; 1993 – The Political Option; 1996 – The Terrorist Solution, gripping stories which we will seek to publish in due course.

(Barry Jones lived and worked in Moscow for twenty-five years (1976-2001) as a translator, translating over sixty books in a variety of specialist and non-specialist subjects, eg. economics, philosophy, politics, sociology, taxation, customs documentation, music, sport, art, philately, circus & entertainment, and much else.

From 1991 to 1994 he was Head of Legal and Business Translation at the INTERFAX News agency in Moscow where he translated the Constitutions of the Russian Federation and those of each of the former Soviet Republics. He also translated dozens of laws, statutes, presidential decrees and other legislative and legal documents as well as a continuous flow of articles on oil and gas, agriculture, mining and minerals, finance and banking, and commerce in general.

In 1995 he began work on a two-year project to translate the archives of more than 100 Russian museums for the US Library of Congress, part of which can be viewed on “ArcheoBiblioBase: The Archives of Russia

From then until his expulsion in chains on trumped up charges in 2001 he worked as a freelance translator. His biggest projects were “The Celestial Garden” – by the playwright, Azat Abdullin — on the life of Rudolf Nuriyev — and a series of learned articles on medieval Georgian astronomy.)

Jan 082011
 

Johnny Cool - messaggero di morte

Johnny Cool (1963), a rarely-seen noir gangster film (starring Henry Silva and Elizabeth Montgomery), is based on a thinly fictionalised account of the life of Sicilian bandit Salvatore Giuliano after his betrayal and presumed death in an ambush in Castelvetrano (Sicily) in 1950. Like Giuliano, ‘Johnny Cool’, starts off as an idealistic freedom fighter corrupted through the patronage of organised crime figure John Colini (modelled on deported US gangster ‘Lucky Luciano’). Colini recruits Johnny Cool as a ‘messenger of death’ and sends him to the USA to take revenge on the former Mafia colleagues who betrayed him and carved up his empire. As with the real-life story of Salvatore Giuliano, given the nature of power and men’s inherent weaknesses, few, if any, have sufficient strength of character not to set themselves above all morality and – with their techniques of violent control – abuse their authority. Inevitably, like Giuliano — especially when collaborating with the landed aristocracy, right-wing politicians, criminals, mafiosi and neo-fascists — whatever idealism they originally may  possess will be poisoned, their social and ethical conscience eroded and corrupted, and their perception of the real world manipulated out of all realistic shape. See also FILMSalvatore Giuliano

Jan 062011
 

The Siege of Sidney Street by Flavio Costantini

Whitechapel anarchists (with Phil Ruff, author of ‘Peter the Painter’ and Martin Wright) commemorate the death of 2 Latvians at the siege of Sidney Street, Stepney, on 3 January 1911.The siege involved the then Home Secretary Winston Churchill, around 700 Police officers and a detachment of Scots Guards. The siege followed a failed burglary at H.S. Harris Jeweller’s in Houndsditch on 16th December 1910, where three police officers were shot dead and two were left disabled. Two Latvians revolutionaries (Fritz Svaars and William Sokolow ) involved in the burglary were tracked to Sidney Street where both were shot after the seven hour siege. The incident has become part of East End folklore.

FILMS: The Siege of Sidney Street – 100th Anniversary Commemoration ; The Siege of Sidney Street (2007 – Bill Fishman and Stella Rimmington) ; The Siege of Sidney Street (1960 – feature film) ; Peter the Painter – parts 1-3 (Phil Ruff and Ian Bone)

TALKS AND MUSIC: Hari Kunzru – The First War on Terror

The Motherwell Bank Robbery

Nov 282010
 

A 1920 silent film directed by Robert Wiene from a screenplay by Hans Janowitz and Carl Mayer. It is one of the most influential of German Expressionist films and is often considered one of the greatest horror movies of all time. This film is cited as having introduced the twist ending in cinema. It has also been postulated that the film — with its tyrannical central character of Caligari — can be considered as an allegory for German social attitudes in the post World War I period. Who knows! . . .

Oct 012010
 

Director Robert Hamer’s fiendishly funny Kind Hearts and Coronets stands as one of Ealing Studios’ greatest triumphs, and one of the most wickedly black comedies ever made. Dennis Price is sublime as an embittered young commoner determined to avenge his mother’s unjust disinheritance by ascending to her family’s dukedom. Unfortunately, eight relatives, all played by the incomparable Alec Guinness, must be eliminated before he can do so.

Generally considered the most sublime of the Ealing comedies and a brilliant vehicle for the astonishing versatility of Alec Guiness – both of which it is – journalist and critic Simon Heffer also considers Kind Hearts and Coronets to be one of the most subversive films ever made in the British cinema, with an innovative, destructive temper that make later anti-Establishment films such as If and A Clockwork Orange seem derivative by comparison.

This 1949 film about a man who murders member after member of his extended family in order to inherit a dukedom is dark not only because its subject is mass murder, but also because of its subtle attack on almost every aspect of British social order – the legal system, the class system, the Church, the City. More unusually, Heffer also considers it as a perfect assault – often disguised by its comedy – on the shallow and narrow lower middle-class values and proprieties that predominated in Britain in the immediate post-war period.

See FILMS

Aug 192010
 

CRIME: ITS CAUSE AND TREATMENT (PDF) draws on the reflections and experience of more than forty years spent in court. ‘Aside from the practice of my profession, the topics I have treated are such as have always held my interest and inspired a taste for books that discuss the human machine with its manifestations and the causes of its varied activity. I have endeavoured to present the latest scientific thought and investigation bearing upon the question of human conduct. I do not pretend to be an original investigator, nor an authority on biology, psychology or philosophy. I have simply been a student giving the subject such attention as I could during a fairly busy life. No doubt some of the scientific conclusions stated are still debatable and may finally be rejected. The scientific mind holds opinions tentatively and is always ready to re-examine, modify or discard as new evidence comes to light.’

Clarence Darrow was a renowned American attorney who successfully represented defendants in two of the most famous trials of the 20th century. He had an unusually broad legal experience, practising corporate, criminal, and labour law — all with great success. He is remembered for his wit, compassion, and passionate defence of civil liberties. (CRIME: ITS CAUSE AND TREATMENT – PDF)