Dec 202012
 

UK: £1.28 ; USA: $2.07 ; Germany: €1,57 ; France: €1,57 ; Spain: €1,57 ; Italy: €1,57 ; Japan: ¥ 167 ; Canada: CDN$ 1.97 ; Brazil: R$ 4,17

PraxedisCover1Práxedis G. Guerrero, anarchist, militant, propagandist, poet and secretary to the ‘Junta Organizadora del Partido Liberal Mexicano’ was the first Mexican anarchist to give his life for Land and Liberty, when he was killed, at the early age of only 28, during an attack on the town of Janos, Chihuahua, in the early months of the Mexican Revolution. Together with Ricardo Flores Magón, Práxedis was one of the main animators of the early revolutionary attempts made by the P.L.M. to rid Mexico of its ageing and dictatorial ruler, Porfirio Díaz who, for forty years, had subjected the Mexican people to the most cruel despotism and slavery; and during the imprisonment of Ricardo Flores Magón, between 1907 and 1910, Práxedis took on this revolutionary task almost single-handed. Joining the P.L.M.’s Junta Organizadora in 1907 soon after its foundation. Práxedis not only became its most able and important ‘military’ organiser, but also a clear-sighted propagandist who contributed much to the anarchist ideas of the P.L.M. In his short but heroic life Práxedis translated the anarchism of theory into the anarchism of practical action.”
Contents: Biography of Práxedis G. Guerrero; Writings of Práxedis G. Guerrero: Racism, Women, Tyranny and a literary essay, Blow!

Dec 062012
 

Librado Rivera (17 August 1864, Aguacatillos, Rayón, San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Died 1 March 1932 in Mexico City.)

Librado Rivera and Ricardo Flores Magón

Of the many comrades and collaborators of Mexican anarchist Ricardo Flores Magón, Librado Rivera was by far the closest. It was a revolutionary partnership that lasted twenty years, rivalling that of Durruti and Ascaso, ending only with Ricardo’s murder (directly or indirectly by the US authorities) in Leavenworth Federal Prison, Kansas. Librado, a founding member of the Partido Liberal Mexicano, was a man who made fundamental and major contributions to its anarchist orientation.

1913 – Arrest of the PLM Organising Committee prior to their imprisonment on McNeil Island (Washington State): Ricardo Flores Magón, with Pinkerton agent; Anselmo L. Figueroa, Librado Rivera (and Pinkerton agent); Enrique Flores Magón.

Librado, however, has been badly neglected on his own account, partly due to his own natural modesty and reticence. He always shunned the limelight while remaining at the same time in the forefront of the struggle, preferring to adopt the role of a seemingly ‘simple militant’. The reality was very different. A tireless anarchist revolutionary and propagandist, he spent more than thirty years fighting, as he would say, ‘for all the oppressed and exploited of the earth’ against injustice and ‘a new society which would have, as well as liberty, love and justice for all!

In addition to Dave Poole’s English text, the book contains many of Rivera’s most important articles, but unfortunately these are IN SPANISH ONLY.

UK £1.29 ; USA $2.07 ; Germany €1,59 ; France €1,59 ; Spain €1,59 ; Italy €1,59 ; Japan ¥165 ; Brazil R$ 4,17

May 272012
 

Press clippings relating to First of May Group (Grupo Primero de Mayo) actions

Spanish anarchism and revolutionary action – 1961-1974 by Octavio Alberola and Ariane Gransac with Prologue by Luis Andrés Edo, ChristieBooks (Kindle edition only – for the moment): KINDLE UK, USA, FRANCE, GERMANY, SPAIN, ITALY

This account of the role of anarchist activism in Europe between 1961 and 1974 (by two of the principal protagonists in the events they describe) was first published in Spanish and French in 1975, shortly after the authors’ release from prison following the kidnapping Francoist banker Baltasar Suárez. To this day it remains  essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the history and development of the libertarian opposition to the Franco Dictatorship subsequent to the urban and rural guerrilla tactics as practised by Sabaté, Facerías, and Caraquemada, etc. It examines the birth of the clandestine ‘Defensa Interior’ Section of the Spanish Libertarian Movement (MLE – CNT-FAI-FIJL) through to ‘The First of May Group‘ and its influence on — and links with — other European action groups of the later 1960s and early 1970s, groups such as ‘The Angry Brigade‘, the ‘Grupos Autonomos de Combate — GAC‘, 2nd June Group, the Movimiento Ibérico de Liberación — ‘MIL‘, Gruppo d’Azione Partigiano – GAP, Grupos de Acción Revolucionaria Internacional — ‘GARI‘, etc.

The authors: Ariane Gransac and Octavio Alberola, Bruges April 1968. The photo was taken soon after their release from their respective Belgian prisons. Ariane had been subsequently expelled but had returned clandestinely with other comrades to meet with Octavio.

The story begins in late 1961 with the creation of Sección DEFENSA INTERIOR (DI), the clandestine planning and action organisation set up at the Limoges Congress in France by the Defence Commission of the recently reunited three wings of the exiled Spanish libertarian movement (MLE — Movimiento Libertario Español) — the CNT, the Spanish anarcho-syndicalist trade union; the FAI, the Iberian Anarchist Federation, and the FIJL, the Iberian Federation of Libertarian Youth. One of the DI’s principal objectives was to organise and carry out attempts on the life of General Franco. Its other role was to generate examples of resistance by means of propaganda by deed. The DI’s short-term objectives were: to remind the world, unremittingly, that Franco’s brutal and repressive dictatorship had not only survived WWII but was now flourishing through tourism and US financial and diplomatic support; to provide solidarity for those continuining the struggle within Spain; to polarise public opinion and focus attention on the plight of the steadily increasing number of political prisoners in Franco’s jails; to interrupt the conduct of Francoist commercial and diplomatic life; undermine its financial basis — tourism; to take the struggle against Franco into the international sphere by showing the world that Franco did not enjoy unchallenged power and that there was resistance to the regime within and beyond Spain’s borders.

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Oct 082011
 

See ChristieBooks Films:
A documentary about what it means to be an anarchist today in Mexico City, a city of 25 million inhabitants. It reminds us of the possibilities of other ways of living. Toby, now 50 years old, was a punk, and together with Marta, they run the Bilbioteca Social Reconstruir, a project launched by the Spanish anarchist Ricardo Mestre. The library contains files of considerable historical importance, as well as more than five thousand titles on the subject of anarchism. Here, Jacinto and Claudio, historians, studied anarchism, from the time of the Flores Magón brothers to today’s decrepit labor system; Ignacio started the Cultural Multiforum ‘Alicia’ 15 years ago The film has much to teach us about contemporary Mexico and a generation which is searching for another, more just world.