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THE GREAT FRENCH REVOLUTION 1789–1793
THE GREAT FRENCH REVOLUTION 1789–1793
Peter Kropotkin’s comprehensive study of the popular and parallel movements that changed forever the course of European history, the French Revolution; from the earliest revolutionary stirrings among the peasants to the agrarian risings in 1789, the struggles for and against the feudal laws, the real causes of the movement of May 31, etc., the contending struggles for political power, and through the Terror to political reaction.
Price: £1.50
A DOMINIE’S FIVE
A DOMINIE’S FIVE
In 1921 Scottish teacher A.S. Neill moved to Hellerau on the outskirts of Dresden where he co-founded an International School to pursue his own ideas on education: that the child’s happiness should be the paramount consideration in deciding its upbringing, a happiness which grows from a sense of personal freedom. After reading what was at the time considered a popular and exciting story — King Solomon’s Mines — to the English-speaking group of five pupils with the result that four of them went to sleep, he conceived the idea of telling the children a story in which they themselves were the participants and actors. Needless to say, the story was a great success, judging by the remarks of the children. This is the story told by Neill. Its imaginativeness is unique as is its whimsical humour. It makes an original contribution to the art of story-telling for children.
Price: £1.50
FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE
FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE
Nietzsche has a poor reputation among many of the liberal intelligentsia for, among other things, his critique of liberal rationalism and his propagation of the over-man/Superman (Übermensch) idea, but is his near villainous reputation deserved? He was, certainly, a complicated, ambiguous and contradictory piece of work, but he did help shape the modern philosophical landscape and is considered to be one of the genuinely great, influential and thinkers who has earned his ledge in the modern philosophical pantheon Not many philosophers have provoked such widely varying assesments: “a madman” (The Chambers Biographical Dictionary); “a greater thinker than Marx” (Horkheimer); the “philosopher of developed capitalism” (Franz Mehring); the “progenitor and ideological founder of the Third Reich” (Hitler); the inspiration for “Nietzschean anarchism” (Gustav Landauer, who conveniently turned a blind eye to Nietzsche's tirades against anarchism, solidarity and communal social interest and cherry-picked his ideas on voluntarism, materialism, along with his occasional tirades against capitalism and the “money economy” to establish the basis for his own take on anarchism.) He was also a significant influence on Lenin and Trotsky, as well as Max Weber, Sartre and other 20th century existentialists The present work is neither polemic nor apology. It is, rather, an attempt to introduce aspiring students and aficionados of moral philosophy to Nietzsche as a person and as a provocative thinker. Contents include a detailed biography, an outline of his views on metaphysics, moral theorising, Christian values, the Superman, art, war, history, etc., together with interpretative sketches and a chronological exposition of all his works. A useful primer on all things Nietzsche.
Price: £1.50
SEVEN RED SUNDAYS
SEVEN RED SUNDAYS
Seven Red Sundays is Sender's third novel. Published in Spanish as 'Siete domingos rojos', it forms a prominent landmark in modernist Spanish literature. It was written in 1932 in the aftermath of the unsuccessful anarcho-syndicalist ‘declarations of Libertarian Communism’ (uprisings) in Figols, Berga, and Cardona in Alto Llobregat (Catalonia), and also in Alocorisa and Teruel (Aragon). The complex story covers seven consecutive days, each a ‘Red Sunday’ of socially transformative class struggle: agitation, street fighting, and a revolutionary general strike triggered by the killing of three anarcho-syndicalists by the police during a banned protest meeting. Following mass labour unrest heightened by the betrayals of the anti-working-class Second Republic, a public funeral in Madrid ends in street fighting, sabotage and the prospect of a nationwide general strike. Sabotage throws the city into darkness, leading to mass arrests, and more state terror, including the torture and cold-blooded murder of union activists by police applying the ‘Law of Flight’ (legitimising the shooting of escaping prisoners). Sender’s use of perspective — in which he looks at the network of connections and the unfolding course of events from ten different viewpoints — explores not only the ambiguities, selfless heroism, frailties and inner conflicts of the central personages struggling for change: love, sublime faith, self sacrifice, religion, betrayal and treachery. It is also a hauntingly beautiful and tender book that captures the mood and feel of revolution as well as the spirit of the Second Spanish Republic in 1932. ‘Magnificent... a masterpiece.’" — New York Times Book Review. ‘An extraordinary book, extremely intelligent. As exciting as a long ski run on a crisp morning and as beautiful and dangerous.’ — New Statesman.
Price: £1.50
CAPTAIN SWING in Sussex and Kent: Rural Rebellion in 1830. The Untold Story of Rural Class War in the South-East of England
CAPTAIN SWING in Sussex and Kent: Rural Rebellion in 1830. The Untold Story of Rural Class War in the South-East of England
IN?1830, after the prolonged agricultural recession that followed the close of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815, a series of riots swept across England’s southern counties. The outbreaks went on to spread, largely unchecked, into East Anglia, the Midlands and several northern counties, eventually to reach Carlisle. The economic hardship of the long-suffering, wretchedly oppressed and half-starved labourers had become so acute that their usual forbearance finally snapped. This agrarian rebellion was fuelled by an unprecedented level of class hatred and bitterness. Driven by a blind desire for revenge and reprisal against the farmers and their wealthy friends, the farmhands were set on a course of violent, direct retaliatory action, regardless of the consequences. Captain Swing explores, closely, what county and national reporters in 1830 were calling a ‘war of poverty against property’, a civil strife of ‘destitution against possession’, and breathes new life and colour into the criminal exploits and violent resistance of the Captain Swing insurgents, to endeavour to understand what their contemporaries described apprehensively as ‘their dark mischief’ and ‘state of reckless insubordination’.
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A MUGSBOROUGH REBEL. Alf Cobb and the Struggle for Justice in Hastings
A MUGSBOROUGH REBEL. Alf Cobb and the Struggle for Justice in Hastings
This edition of ‘A Mugsborough Rebel: Alf Cobb’ by Mike Matthews is especially welcome, as 2011 is the centenary of the death of Robert Tressell, author of the famous book The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists. Tressell’s semi-factual novel, set in the run-down seaside resort of Hastings in the early 1900s, had a major influence on many leaders of the British Labour movement throughout much of the 20th century.
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THE GREAT GAME. A Russian Perspective by Professor Grigory L. Bondarevsky
THE GREAT GAME. A Russian Perspective by Professor Grigory L. Bondarevsky
This unique Russian account of Kipling’s ‘Great Game‘ — from a strictly Russian perspective — takes the form of a chapter by chapter review, by Professor Grigory L. Bondarevsky — a Russian academician (Oriental Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences and the Russian Academy of Social Science) who played an important part in defining post-war Soviet policy in Central Asia and the Middle East — of Peter Hopkirk’s excellent study The Great Game: The Struggle for Empire in Central Asia. This unique Russian account of Kipling's 'Great Game' — from a strictly Russian perspective — takes the form of a chapter by chapter review, by Professor Grigory L. Bondarevsky — a Russian academician (Oriental Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences and the Russian Academy of Social Science) who played an important part in defining post-war Soviet policy in Central Asia and the Middle East — of Peter Hopkirk’s excellent study The Great Game: The Struggle for Empire in Central Asia. The review initially appeared over a matter of months in the journal Central Asia and the Caucasus in World Affairs (1995 — ed. S. Christie). This book is not only a secret service history, or to be more accurate a history of the rivalry between the secret services of the British and Russian empires in the nineteenth century; it is also an entertaining account of the geographical discovery of unknown and sometimes forgotten countries in Central Asia, which was then a very mysterious place.
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THE ANARCHIST PIMPERNEL. Francisco Ponzán Vidal (1936 1944). The anarchists in the Spanish Civil War and the Allied Escape Networks of WWII)
THE ANARCHIST PIMPERNEL. Francisco Ponzán Vidal (1936 1944). The anarchists in the Spanish Civil War and the Allied Escape Networks of WWII)
The anarchists in the secret war against Francoism, Nazism, and the escape and evasion lines of WWII
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MOSCOW AIN'T THE PLACE It Used To Be
MOSCOW AIN'T THE PLACE It Used To Be
MOSCOW 1991 to 1996. Following the collapse of Gorbachev’s Soviet Union, Norman ‘Nobby’ Jackson, Moscow-based failed business 'consultant' and amateur Classicist turned private detective, joins forces again with his old sparring partner Colonel Lev Alexandrovitch Shcheglov, head of Moscow’s CID (see ‘Nobby’s’ previous adventures in ‘Moscow Ain’t Such A Bad Place’), to disentangle a Byzantine plot that links the murders of London gangsters prior to an international criminal convention seeking to carve up territories and ‘spheres of interest’ in the former Soviet Union, and the serial killer of Muscovite prostitutes over a five-year period. The labyrinthine investigation leads ‘Nobby’ — ably assisted by Anzhelika, his ‘clairvoyant’ lover and business partner — through the cut-throat post-Soviet milieu of gangster-capitalism, the mafiya, political conspiracies, would-be putschists, and an international terrorist plot to destroy Moscow, provoke a nuclear war and the break-up of the Russian Federation.
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MOSCOW AIN'T SUCH A BAD PLACE
MOSCOW AIN'T SUCH A BAD PLACE
MOSCOW 1987: With Gorbachev’s Soviet?Union in a state of flux and uncertainty, Londoner Norman ‘Nobby’ Robert Jackson — amateur Classicist, fluent Russian-speaker, business consultant and blackmarketeer living comfortably in Moscow with two mistresses — is approached by a fellow British businessman to locate the ‘Apsheron icon’. All is not what it seems, however. Next day ‘Nobby’ discovers the man brutally bludgeoned to death in his hotel room. Who has killed him, and why? Pursued to Yalta with his mistresses, he finds he has become the target for a killer. Determined to find those responsible for a series of brutal murders of friends and associates attending a British trade exhibition in Moscow, ‘Nobby’ finds his quest entangling him with Major Shcheglov of the Moscow Police, Grigori Vladimirovitch of the KGB, and George Trenden, head of the SIS’s Soviet Desk, taking him from Yalta to Moscow, London and Devon and back to Moscow again on the trail of a mysterious and powerful international cabal conspiring to change the course of history.
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MARIO RODRÍGUEZ LOSADA (O Pinche, O Langullo). Guerrilla Warfare in Galicia
MARIO RODRÍGUEZ LOSADA (O Pinche, O Langullo). Guerrilla Warfare in Galicia
Mario Rodríguez Losada, (Mario de Langullo (nom de guerre 'O Pinche'), was one of the many legendary guerrillas who, after the fall of the Republic, took to the mountains of Galicia in North-West Spain to carry on the armed struggle against the repressive forces of the Franco regime. Mario's guerrilla group, one of the most active in the region, was based in the Sierra de Queija and operated in the area of El Bollo-La Gudina-Verin and Castro Caldelas — from the spring of 1941 until August 1968 when he went into exile in France. Mario Rodríguez Losada (O Pinche, O Langullo. Guerrilla Warfare in Galicia, by his friend and biographer Antonio Téllez, is a riveting personal account of the lived experiences of one band of little-known anti-Francoist guerrillas who operated in the mountains of Galicia. Tellez's story of O Pinche's life provides a rare insight into the 'intangible' atmosphere of events of the time, and the outlook and motives of those who, putting their lives on the line, refused to abandon the struggle against injustice and oppression.
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SPANISH ANARCHISM and Revolutionary Action (1961-1974)
SPANISH ANARCHISM and Revolutionary Action (1961-1974)
This account of the role of anarchist activism in Europe between 1961 and 1974, by two of the principal protagonists in the events they describe, was first published in Spanish and French in 1975. To this day it remains essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the history and development of the libertarian opposition to the Franco Dictatorship subsequent to the urban and rural guerrilla tactics as practised by Sabate, Facerias, and Caraquemada, etc. It examines the birth of the clandestine 'Defensa Interior' Section of the Spanish Libertarian Movement (MLE - CNT-FAI-FIJL) through to 'The First of May Group' and its influence on — and links with — other European action groups of the later 1960s and early 1970s, groups such as 'The Angry Brigade', the 'Grupos Autonomos de Combate — GAC', 2nd June Group, the Movimiento Iberico de Liberacion — 'MIL', Gruppo d'Azione Partigiano – GAP, Grupos de Accion Revolucionaria Internacional — 'GARI', etc.
Price: £1.50
TWENTY YEARS in Franco’s Jails. An Anarchist In Franco’s Prisons
TWENTY YEARS in Franco’s Jails. An Anarchist In Franco’s Prisons
JUAN BUSQUETS VERGES was only 21 when he was arrested for his activities with the anti-Francoist urban and rural anarchist guerrillas in 1949. He was among the few fortunates to have his death sentence commuted to one of life imprisonment. Busquets made a number of attempts to escape, the final one, ending with him falling 30 feet and breaking his leg. Remaining quiet and unseen he crawled to a ditch where he lay in agony until the morning when the guards found him. They battered him with the butts of their rifles until he was unconscious, breaking his nose as well as his leg, and kept him for two months, without treatment, in solitary confinement. Born into an anarcho-syndicalist family in Catalonia, a region of Spain in which — at the time – around three-quarters of the workers were unionised in the anarcho-syndicalist Confederación Nacional del Trabajo (CNT), the injustices and provocations of everyday life in Franco’s Spain were equally important in awakening Busquets’ irrepressible rebellious spirit. However, it was not until he moved to the French mining town of Cransac and met the young anarchist coalminers that he became more deeply involved in raising financial and moral support for those still struggling inside Spain against Francoism. Fund-raising proved not to be enough and Busquets made contact with the rural guerrilla leader Marcelino Massana at a small Toulouse hotel located near the offices of the Intercontinental Committee of the CNT. Massana tried to talk the young Busquets out of his plan, but to no avail …
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GINO LUCETTI and his attempt to assassinate Benito Mussolini (Il Duce) 11 September 1926
GINO LUCETTI and his attempt to assassinate Benito Mussolini (Il Duce) 11 September 1926
Gino Lucetti (August 31, 1900 - September 17, 1943) was an Italian anarchist and would-be assassin of Benito Mussolini. Born in Carrara, Italy, he fought as a soldier during World War I and later emigrated to France, returning to attempt to assassinate Benito Mussolini on September 11, 1926, in Rome's Porta Pia square. Lucetti was tried in June 1927 and condemned to 30 years in prison as was the politician Vincenzo Baldazzi, condemned for helping him prepare the attempt. In 1943 Lucetti escaped from prison but was killed shortly afterwards during a German bombing raid on Ischia.
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THE ORIGINS OF THE ANARCHIST MOVEMENT IN CHINA
THE ORIGINS OF THE ANARCHIST MOVEMENT IN CHINA
The republication of Albert Meltzer's The Origins of the Anarchist Movement in China is a major event. Outside of The Origins . . . Robert A. Scalapino and George T. Yu’s The Chinese Anarchist Movement (which does not go beyond the early 1920s, stopping short of the Shanghai Commune) and Olga Lang’s Pa Chin and His Writings: Chinese Youth Between the Two Revolutions most of what has been written about Anarchism in China has been as sidelights to other subjects. In the third number of Libero International, organ of CIRA Nippon, there appears a 34 item bibliography (Asian Anarchism in Western Languages (2): China — republished here as an appendix) — heading the list is Origins. . . “Libero International refers to it as ‘the pioneer libertarian study on the Chinese movement’ — and so it is. The publication is not a comprehensive study, but a broad, sweeping outline of Chinese Anarchism from its beginnings under the dual impacts of Chinese anarchists in France and Japan, all the way to the Cultural Revolution. Neither is it a scholarly work. These limitations must be kept in mind. It was meant as an introduction to a chapter of the Unknown History whose definitive work has yet to be written. This writer was not even aware of there being an anarchist movement in China before reading ‘The Origins . . .’ — that it informs those interested that such a movement did indeed exist, and exerted a powerful influence as well — therein lies the value of The Origins . . . Written in the inimitable Meltzer style, complete with anecdotes and fascinating sidelights (such as the role of Esperanto, or a note on the depiction of Jews as a type in the writings of the anarchist Pa Chin), it is an ideal jumping off point for further studies…” Shelby Shapiro
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THE RUSSIAN TRAGEDY
THE RUSSIAN TRAGEDY
THESE PAMPHLETS, ISSUED HERE in book form for the ?rst time (The Russian Tragedy, The Russian Revolution and the Communist Party, The Kronstadt Rebellion), are Alexander Berkman’s ?rst writings after leaving Russia in December of 1921. He had entered Russia just two years earlier, ?lled with devotion to the ideals of the Russian revolution and anxious to contribute his share to the revolutionary process. It was a return home for him, as he had lived his ?rst 17 years in Russia and had grown up among the revolutionaries of that era. Now he was welcomed back as an important revolutionary exile from his adopted United States. Alexander Berkman, Emma Goldman, and 247 other “politicals” had been deported from the United States on December 21, 1919. Berkman and Goldman, the two most active anarchists in America since the turn of the century, had only recently each completed two year prison sentences for active opposition to the World War I draft (as founders and organisers of the No-Conscription League) and, though resentful of being so abruptly forced to terminate their organising in America, looked forward to enthusiastic participation in the revolutionary experiment in their native land, Russia.
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WITH THE PEASANTS OF ARAGON. Libertarian Communism in the Liberated Areas
WITH THE PEASANTS OF ARAGON. Libertarian Communism in the Liberated Areas
In 1936-37 Augustin Souchy Bauer visited towns and villages in Aragón that, soon after July 19, 1936, began to live a lifestyle without precedent in all history. One after the other they collectivised the land and established libertarian communism, spontaneously — but with all due deliberation. The story of this trip that Souchy made together with Emma Goldman part of the way is a document of extraordinary importance not only for the facts presented but because it informs the reader of today how and in what circumstances an idea regarded as purely utopian until then became a reality. . The reader will learn how an economic and social system developed that was truly communal and anti-authoritarian. Anarchists of the National Confederation of Labor and the Iberian Federation of Anarchists (CNT-FAI), socialists of the General Union of Workers (UGT) and individualists lived together in the same community in a way of life not even imagined until then.
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THE POVERTY OF STATISM. Anarchism versus Marxism  A debate
THE POVERTY OF STATISM. Anarchism versus Marxism A debate
Anarchist response to Nikolai Bukharin’s ‘Anarchy and Scientific Communism’; a libertarian critique of the 'proletarian' state, the 'dictatorship of the proletariat', the organisation of production, etc., by two of Bukharin’s anarchist contemporaries. Includes Rocker’s essay ‘Marx and Anarchism’. Introduced by Albert Meltzer.
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THE MEANING OF ANARCHISM
THE MEANING OF ANARCHISM
Captain Jack White (1879-1946): Any study of anarchism anywhere in Ireland would be amiss if it did not include mention of the first organiser of the Irish Citizen Army: republican, communist and then anarchist, Captain Jack White. Born at Whitehall, near Broughshane in County Antrim, White spent much of his childhood in England before joining the British Army and serving overseas. The details of his early life are fairly well documented and highlight his relatively wealthy, landed Protestant upbringing, his uneasy transition to a British Army officer and his first major clash with Roman Catholicism. The Russian revolutionary uprising of 1905 had a singular effect on White and he was drawn, particularly, to Leo Tolstoy, the eponymous creator of ‘Christian anarchism’ in the years after that event. Tolstoy’s pacifism probably appealed to White after his experiences in the Boer War. He resigned his commission soon after and worked for a while in Bohemia and then Canada (as a lumberjack), before moving to England and joining the anarchist commune at Whiteways, near Stroud in Gloucestershire, where he remained until 1912 or early 1913. After a brief spell in Ulster he moved to Dublin where he was involved with a small group of intellectuals known as the Civic League. The working class upsurge of the 1913 Lockout was entering a crucial stage and White was an enthusiastic supporter of the Irish Trades and General Workers’ Union (ITGWU), and their strike against the capitalist oligarch and Irish nationalist newspaper baron, William Martin Murphy. White spoke and agitated alongside Jim Larkin and ‘Big Bill’ Haywood of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and initiated the idea of — and then commanded — the Irish Citizen Army, a worker’s militia, originally the ITGWU at arms in a sense and, through James Connolly’s influence, pliable in the hands of the military council of the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB) in the lead-up to the Easter Rising of 1916.
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PETER KROPOTKIN: His Federalist Ideas
PETER KROPOTKIN: His Federalist Ideas
One thing on which all anarchists and libertarian socialists agree is that the social revolution should be the result of a popular movement, not one imposed from above. As Peter Kropotkin, probably the best-known of the anarchist theoreticians, described it, “[the revolution] must take the form of a widely spread popular movement, during which movement, in every town and village invaded by the insurrectionist spirit, the masses set themselves set themselves to the work of reconstructing society...without waiting for schemes and orders from above...They may not be – they are sure not to be – the majority of the nation. But if they are a respectably numerous minority of cities and villages scattered over the country...they will be able to win the right to pursue their own course”. Following the Russian Revolution in 1917, Kropotkin began developing his federalist ideas as a means of countering the authoritarian centralised state-building agenda then being pursued by the Bolsheviks. His vision of a federalist Russia was based on the existing regions of the Tsarist empire: Finland, the Baltic provinces, Ukraine, Georgia, Armenia, Siberia and others, each of which would have received international recognition of its right to govern itself. But, as Camillo Berneri points out, Kropotkin envisaged that, ultimately, each component of the new Russian Federation would itself by a federation of free cities and rural communities.
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 Posted by at 1:33 pm